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NARO
National Association of Royalty Owners
The ONLY national organization representing, solely and without
compromise, oil & gas royalty interests.


 

NARO Appalachia Events




Hotel reservations should be made with The Greenbrier

855-805-7617 $189 per room/per night based on double occupancy.Resort Fees, historical fees and taxes will apply.

 Deadline for room reservations at NARO Rate is September 28, 2017 Refunds for event registration will be subject to a $50 processing fee.

 No registration refunds after September 29, 2017.

 




Join us for our 7th Annual  NARO Appalachia Conference


The view/print the agenda, CLICK HERE


To view/print the registration form,

CLICK HERE


To register for this event online, CLICK HERE.


To view/print the sponsor and exhibitor information, CLICK HERE.






Call to Action!

May 11, 2016


Please copy the text below, and email a message to Kurt Wadzinski at blm_es_comments@blm.gov.

OR print the attached letter, EA Landowner Comment (2).pdf sign it and mail it to the BLM address below.

THIS MUST BE DONE BY MAY 29, 2016




Kurt Wadzinski 

Planning and Environmental Coordinator,

BLM Eastern States Northeastern States District Office

626 East Wisconsin Ave, Suite 200 Milwaukee, WI 53202

EMAIL: blm_es_comments@blm.gov 

 


Re: NEPA# DOI-BLM-Eastern States-0030-2016-0002-EA

Comments Regarding the Marietta Unit for the Athens Ranger District EA and Unsigned FONSI for Oil and Gas Leasing, Wayne National Forest 


Dear Mr. Wadzinski,  
I am a landowner/mineral owner. While I was pleased to learn that the Bureau of Land Management is moving forward with leasing, there were some items in the Environmental Assessment (EA) that I found troubling.  


First, I want to make clear that leasing in the Wayne National Forest would, in fact, have a direct impact on my right to develop my private minerals and land. The EA claims that leasing in the forest will not impact development of my minerals. That’s simply not true, due to Ohio’s unitization laws.  


Second, I found the EA to be highly offensive in the “environmental justice” section, page 84. The notion that the federal government can tell us that private citizens are not capable of reading a legal document nor able to determine where a well pad should go on our private property is an outrage. Using this basis because we live in Appalachia is truly disrespectful to the people who live and work here. Further, the BLM has no right to tell private citizens what we can or cannot do on our private land as it relates to proposed activities. The language found on page 84 would imply that the BLM can invoke itself into land use discussions on privately held land. This is unacceptable. 


Third, and as the EA points out, the U.S. Forest Service has been acquiring land in Appalachia for years, which means that our counties and schools have received less money as well. Plus, the federal government continues to add land to the WNF, as there are plans for 10,000 acres of private minerals to revert back to the government over time. Holding up leasing of federal minerals in the Marietta Unit is a violation of our personal property rights and continues to create hardships for our region.  


Once again, I encourage the BLM to move forward with leasing immediately and also make appropriate changes to the language of the EA, as portions are not reflective of the scope of this matter.  


Please accept this letter for consideration of formal public comment.

Thank you in advance. 
Sincerely,  
__________________________________________ Landowner  


__________________________________________ Address  


__________________________________________ City, State, Zip





Get on our contact list for information about upcoming educational events and
Calls to Action!

Email Dee Copeland, DCopeland@naro-us.org and request to be added to the contact data base for NARO Appalachia.








Page title

 

 

NARO Appalachia

Representing Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky and North Carolina

 

 

 

The Marcellus Shale lies under much of northern Appalachia, 6,000 to 8,000 feet below the surface; the pores in the shale contain large quantities of natural gas. The shale layer becomes thicker from west to east beginning at about 50 feet in Ohio to more than 100 feet thick in central PA and NY. 

 

Geologists have known about the gas in this area for years . It is reported that settlers as early as the 1600s noticed "burning springs" through out Appalachia.  In the early 1800s oil and gas was discovered accidentally by salt well drillers. By 1840 natural gas was being used to evaporate brine water in Butler County, Pa.

 

It is the new technology of horizontal drilling, combined with hydraulic fracturing, that has turned recovering the gas locked in these rocks the big new “Shale Play”.   It wasn't until about 2007 that Appalachia began turning heads in "the oil and gas states" Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana.  Mineral owners in the Appalachian area began seeing  Landmen knocking on doors to obtain gas leases. 

NARO was established in 1981.  The NARO Appalachia chapter began in October of 2008 to provide mineral owners some organized support, education and advocacy.


 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is happening in Ohio?

click the image to purchase from the artist 

 

A New Wave Of Investors Is Betting On Small-Town Oil Drilling Undefined and Winning

Africa Oil went through the roof. Guindo sold when the stock had climbed to around $9. He grossed close to a million dollars. And his confidence as an investor undefined an investor in oil and gas undefined soared. “I felt comfortable in my own shoes to say, What is out there?” he recalls. “How do you actually make money?” A few months later, he left Ospraie. He took his money and looked beyond New York City. For something even bigger. 

 

He thinks he has found it undefined in Appalachia of all places, in an Ohio town with fewer than 3,300 residents, in a town where the most popular restaurant, Donna’s Deli, closes after the noontime rush. In a town of five streetlights and with a mayor who’s also a minister and who sometimes preaches on Sundays about the virtue of frugality. In a town that knows poverty and is only now trying to figure out wealth. In a town without hedge funds, or a Core club. 

 

What does it have? It has, the locals only recently realized, oil and natural gas, and lots of it undefined and everything that comes with an oil boom, including dreamers like Farid Guindo.  Click here to read the entire story.




 

Natural gas pulled from Ohio’s Utica shale could be moved to the Gulf Coast with the expansion of an existing pipeline.

Kentucky-based Texas Gas Transmission LLC has proposed adding north-to-south capacity to its existing 690-mile pipeline system. It would retain south-to-north flows.

The Ohio-Louisiana Access Project would run from Lebanon in southwest Ohio to Perrysville, La. Connections would be built to ship natural gas from eastern Ohio, West Virginia and western Pennsylvania.

The project must win approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

Construction would begin next August, and the project is scheduled to begin service in June 2016, says the company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Texas-based Boardwalk Pipeline Partners

Natural gas pulled from Ohio’s Utica shale could be moved to the Gulf Coast with the expansion of an existing pipeline.

Kentucky-based Texas Gas Transmission LLC has proposed adding north-to-south capacity to its existing 690-mile pipeline system. It would retain south-to-north flows.

 

The Ohio-Louisiana Access Project would run from Lebanon in southwest Ohio to Perrysville, La. Connections would be built to ship natural gas from eastern Ohio, West Virginia and western Pennsylvania.

 

The project must win approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

 

Construction would begin next August, and the project is scheduled to begin service in June 2016, says the company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Texas-based Boardwalk Pipeline Partners.  Click here to read the entire story.

 

 

 

Bank Deposits Booming in Utica Shale Counties 

Just five years ago, in the midst of the Great Recession, it probably would have been unthinkable to see some of Ohio’s fastest-growing banks located in small rural areas east of Interstate 77.

 

But several years into the state’s shale fracking boom, it’s clear eastern Ohio is a nice place to collect customer deposits as landowners attract huge sums of money from drillers and local businesses see more activity.

 

“We are definitely hearing anecdotally of improvements in the deposit flows from some of the banks in eastern Ohio,” Charles Crowley, managing director of investment banking at Boenning & Scattergood Inc. in Cleveland, told me. “It has been a very sluggish economy for decades and it hasn’t necessarily been real exciting for investors. This has changed that dynamic.”

 

In Monroe County, home to five of the state’s 10 highest-producing natural gas wells, bank deposits grew by 77 percent over the past five years to $203 million, according to midyear data from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

 

By comparison, all the state’s banks collectively increased deposits 15 percent since 2009 to $272 billion.  Click here to read the entire story.

 

 

What is happening in West Virginia?

 

 

Oil, Gas Companies Bid for Drilling Rights Under the Ohio River

Facing a possible budget shortfall for the 2015 budget, state commerce officials in West Virginia have accepted bids from oil and gas companies to drill about a mile under a 14-mile-long portion of the Ohio River that lies within the Marcellus shale.

 

 “We received four bids on three different segments of the river. They were all portions of the river that were nominated by companies that were interested in developing those areas. They are already operating in those areas,” a spokesperson for the West Virginia Department of Commerce told Rigzone.

 

The four separate bids received by the Department of Commerce before the close of the bidding process were:

  • Noble Energy Inc. bid a 20-percent royalty payment and $211.11 per-acre cash bonus
  • Statoil ASA bid a 20-percent royalty payment and $8,125 per-acre cash bonus
  • Triad Hunter LLC bid a 18-percent royalty payment and a $7,100 per-acre cash bonus
  • Gastar Exploration Inc. bid a 20-percent royalty payment and $3,500 per-acre cash bonus -
  • Click here to read the entire story.

 

 

 

What is happening in Kentucky?

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Supporters

Appalachia News

Local news of interest:

 http://www.statejournal.com/story/26394549/changes-to-the-oil-gas-industry-create-benefits-concern

             

Appalachia News

  • News will be updated shortly, please check back later.

Appalachia Events